Posts Tagged ‘TMJ Treatment’

Happy Hearts Day!

Well, it’s been a while, so what better place to pick back up than a holiday? Happy Valentine’s Day! Cheesy Hallmark holiday though it may be, enjoy yourself and the time spent spoiling — or being spoiled by — your special someone today.

However, don’t forget to spread a good dose of love and appreciation for your teeth, too. It is terribly cliche for me to warn you against the candy-popping and chocolate-chewing action presented on such an indulgent occasion, so I won’t. Don’t worry about it too much today; the guilt trip is coming tomorrow and the next day and the day after that… not really, but perhaps you’ll find my next several posts intriguing.

I’ll be writing up some informative entries on our health-centered dental approach, answering questions such as why we have set ourselves apart as “holistic,” or why we go to such great lengths in finding the best materials, machines, and technological advances in order to keep your oral health in the best condition possible. Why should you care about holistic dental treatment? What’s the difference between us and your local family dentist, and how, if at all, does it affect your health? What if your oral health has been poor for years, so you have just given up altogether or have become too embarrassed to seek help? Is there hope? (Preview: Yes! Of course there is hope!) Why do we push for higher standards? What’s all this talk about putting ozone in your mouth; quicker, healthier methods of implant installation; why “silver” cavity fillings are causing a myriad of diseases and poison problems, and how we deal with that; how a certain disorder can cause pain and injury to your entire head and neck; and how we choose to fix it? Why is nutrition such a big deal? Again, why should you care about any of this? A dentist is a dentist is a dentist, right? If my teeth look good to a highly educated professional, I’m in good shape, right? Right?

Proper — in the most healthful meaning of the word — dental care affects you more than you think. Answers are on their way.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

 

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Occlusal Correction: Aesthetics

I figured I’d end the series on correcting malocclusions with “pretty” thoughts… thoughts about the visible benefits of occlusal correction.

What makes your smile natural also makes it beautiful. A correct bite will show in a smile that looks exactly how it was designed to look, not only displayed by straight teeth, but by the rest of your face as well. Your jaw moves in a way that is no longer detrimental to the surrounding muscles and joints in your face; your teeth no longer inhibit that movement or acquire further wear-and-tear; and you’ll be feeling better overall, because unusual tightness or tiredness in your mouth area will be gone. Add to all of that the confidence of a pretty smile!

A different kind of analysis, called a functional and aesthetic analysis, may be performed during the therapy in order to ensure the longterm health and beauty of your teeth.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

Occlusal Correction: Occlusal Splint Therapy

This type of therapy for occlusal correction is temporary, but does a lot of good things over a period of time to protect your bite and its bad effects on your whole chewing system — even your whole head, down to your shoulders.

I’ve mentioned the MAGO way back when, and how I use it to treat TMJ cases. This is just about identical. It is basically a hard plastic mouthguard designed to fit your mouth in such a way that provides a stable bite and prevents further clenching and/or grinding of your teeth. The splint also relieves jaw and muscle pain caused by malocclusion problems. The kind of treatment you’ll need after using an occlusal splint will determine how long you wear it, and may even change the course of negative effects again caused by your malocclusion.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

Occlusal Correction: Orthognathic Surgery

Okay, say it with me: “or-thog-NATH-ic.”

Quite a tongue-twister, yes, and this complicated name is fitting for what it is. Orthognathic surgery digs a little bit more into the nitty-gritty of occlusal correction, because it is full-on surgery of the jaw or teeth. Orthognathic surgery moves the jaw or teeth into their proper positions in cases where braces or smaller-scale solutions will not be effective. If bones need cutting, screwing, or reinforcing, this is what should be done.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

What Is A Malocclusion?

A malocclusion is a “bad bite.” Easy enough, right?

If a good occlusion is defined as a bite where all components of the chewing system work together harmoniously, then a bad occlusion — a malocclusion — means that the teeth do not match up and fit together when you bite down. One or more of the components involved in the chewing system may not be functioning properly, and is most likely what is causing the teeth to come down abnormally.

The funny thing is that most of us don’t realize that we have a malocclusion until we go in for an occlusal analysis. After a while, we unconsciously train our muscles to chew in a certain way, to move in a certain direction repeatedly, so that it does seem like our teeth fit together fine. But you can’t really tell the difference between what’s “normal” and what’s “really normal” until you’ve had adjustments made because you’ve been doing it a certain way for so long.

Having a malocclusion almost guarantees wear and tear on your teeth, facial muscle fatigue, and long-term damage and/or disease throughout your whole mouth and jaw area. Having your malocclusion corrected is absolutely necessary for your mouth’s health and ultimately your whole body.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com