Posts Tagged ‘dental drugs’

Dental Care While Pregnant or Breastfeeding, Pt. 3

So I’ve talked your ears off about the importance of dentally preparing before pregnancy happens, especially if your body needs to detox from mercury vapor. But, like the majority of people, you probably have not done so. Mothers and mothers-to-be, something urgent comes up and you must go to the dentist for one reason or another. What are things you should be aware of?

First off, do not mess with amalgam (metal) fillings in your teeth until you are done breastfeeding. Each case has its own individual implications, so if for some reason yours need working on, you’ll have to talk to me directly about the safest way to do so.

Secondly, most dentists use an array of chemicals in their offices for various purposes (sterilization, anesthesia, antibiotics, sedation, painkilling, etc.). I use them myself; I just prefer not to when I don’t have to. Again, these substances are generally accepted as having no ill effect on a pregnancy after short-term use. I will say, however, that NSAIDs should be strictly avoided.

For a mother, I personally am not comfortable with any exposure, period, and will avoid it as far as I can; but it’s up to you to do your research, ask questions, and be involved in the decisions made for your and your child(ren)’s health. Part of why I am so excited about using ozone in my dentistry is because it is multi-functional and completely safe, even for members of society with more vulnerable physical health. It is no-risk with fabulous results. Using it with a laser takes care of many things that dentists keep various chemicals on hand for.

Lastly, specifically for those breastfeeding, I offer practical advice. If your in this situation where you must see a dentist for a problem while nursing, there are precautions you should take. Drugs you take are passed to your milk  in concentrations of 1-3% of your dose. It may not sound like much, but it doesn’t take much to start polluting the development of infants. The drugs are usually cleared from your system in 24 hours. To avoid passing any toxins to your baby, pump extra milk at least a day before your appointment (it is a sound decision to have extra breastmilk stored anyway for situations like this). On the day of appointment after the drugs, anesthetics, etc., are administered, pump and throw away the milk you produce for the next 24 hours.

After that it is safe to continue nursing your child normally. If you notice any adverse effects in you or your child, call the doctor immediately.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

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Dental Care While Pregnant or Breastfeeding, Pt. 2

Most moms and moms-to-be know that dental care is recommended throughout pregnancy, since hormonal changes can cause more of a susceptibility to discomfort and infection. Dental problems also may bring to light a more serious underlying problem that these mothers should be aware of. Though it is my personal opinion that most dental evaluation and care should be taken care of before conception (a long time before conception if mercury removal is involved), I believe that light, routine dental care, such as cleanings or mild gingivitis treatment can be safe and effective during pregnancy.

Since my practice uses ozone in place of many harsher chemicals and typical dental medications, much can be done without fretting about affecting babies in utero or through mom’s milk. Healing is accelerated and accomplished more naturally when ozone is used. An already concerned mother should never be forced to compromise between “following the doctor’s orders” by getting dental care but exposing her developing children to drugs and toxins. Cleaning is harmless if there are no mercury fillings to agitate.

Many of the common drugs, painkillers, antibiotics, anesthetics, etc. used in the dentist’s office have been declared “safe,” or at least not significantly detrimental for a pregnant or nursing mother. A good dentist is cognizant of the most recent information regarding safe substances for his pregnant or nursing patients. For many patients, the reassurance that those substances are safe enough is all they need. However, others want to remain as clean and toxin-free as possible. I lean toward this side myself. Even if no adverse effects are found on growing babies, inside or outside the womb, there is no guarantee that there are other long-term consequences for dental drug exposure. Every drug is a foreign substance to the body; every drug is designed to manipulate certain functions in order to successfully carry out a medical purpose. In many cases they are lifesavers and great aids in the process of healing and managing pain.

But there is always, always a consequence, seen or unseen, for this medical/dental intervention or manipulation. It is only logical to conclude that delicately growing babies will be affected to some degree. We may not see it right away. It may remain undetected as the baby grows into childhood, then adulthood, and accumulates other health problems that would never be connected with Mom’s treatments while pregnant or nursing. The important thing is to educate yourself as best you can and make the best decisions for your family’s health.

I’ll get to the practical side of things in the next post.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com