Posts Tagged ‘cavities’

Icon Dental Treatment

There’s a very new kind of treatment recently released for early-stage cavities. This treatment is fabulous in that it uses no drilling or anesthesia for halting and even reversing growing pre-cavities. If you happen to discover white spots on your teeth, see the dentist. A white spot is actually an indication of enamel weakness and where a cavity will eventually develop. Icon gets rid of these, not only restoring the enamel, but also the tooth’s consistent pearly-whiteness.

The treatment is a quick step-by-step process where the tooth and damaged area are cleaned and kept dry (easy for me with my handy-dandy ozonating machine); a series of Icon’s special gels are applied, each left to sit for a designated activation & infiltration time, then carefully cleaned off; the teeth are polished; and that’s it! The entire process can be as short as 15 minutes with absolutely no painful drilling or invasive removal of natural materials. Immediately after the procedure, dramatic cosmetic improvements will be noticeable.

Check out Icon’s demonstration on YouTube… and if you are one of those individuals who are dentist-phobics, don’t be alarmed. None of this feels as weird as it looks, by far. If you still can’t get past the atmosphere of the place and letting someone prod around your mouth, I have that covered too.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

P.S. By the way, “caries” are going to be mentioned a lot in the video. Caries is just another name — the sciencey, dental-world name — for cavities. Enjoy!

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You and Your Bite

Occlusal disease is the fancy name for “bite disease”. What? How does one’s bite become diseased, you ask? Well, there are three types of bad things that can happen to your teeth: decay (cavities), gum disease, and bite disease. We’ve discussed the first two, so here goes occlusal (bite) disease.

Occlusal disease is the condition where your bite — the way your teeth come down onto each other — is uneven, crooked, or misaligned. You may not be able to bite down all the way or chew thoroughly, and your jaw muscles must work harder for these simple tasks. Because of the unevenness, some teeth are worn down faster than others, and further wearing, breaking, or chipping of teeth may occur. The extra work on the jaw muscles also causes pain all around the jaw, mouth, head, and neck. “Aging” teeth may not be aging at all — the wear and tear is because of a bite problem long left untreated. It’s a mess!

Occlusal disease is often hard to spot. Unlike cavities or gum disease, it’s not always visually apparent. What may appear to be a randomly broken tooth could be a more severe underlying problem… and fixing just that one tooth is not going to help if the whole jaw is misaligned.

Dentists trained at The Pankey Institute develop the eyes for recognizing bite problems, making it less of a mystery to solve if one finds himself suffering the symptoms. Much research goes into fixing the problem; casts and models of your teeth are made so the dentist can see where the problem lies and how it can be adjusted (bite analysis). Occlusal disease also ties directly into bioesthetic dentistry and treating TMJ disorders. A simple, non-surgical tweaking of the muscles (most often used with a MAGO, or mouthguard-looking splint that helps “train” the muscles to realign in the correct positions) may very well be the solution to chewing food without harming your skull, and preserving functional, straight teeth well into your later years.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

How Ozone Therapy Lessens Pain

If you have been treated with ozone therapy before, possibly during your own root canal or periodontitis treatment, did you notice any difference in how painful the process was… or wasn’t?  Ozone actually contains pain-alleviating properties; so instead of a chemical sterilizer (which might cause additional pain to the procedure, or even spark an allergic reaction in the patient), ozone actually gives a slight soothing, clean feeling to the area because of its natural healing qualities. This makes ozone therapy ideal for treating painful afflictions such as canker sores, abscesses, and other disease/wounds. Quick healing ensues, which saves yet another need for prolonged painkiller use!

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

Cavities, Acid, and Ozone… Oh my!

I know, I know… here comes the ozone again! I’ve explained how we use ozone in our dentistry in previous posts. After all this talk of nasty acid-making bacteria wreaking havoc on teeth, it’s essential — for my ozone-using practice in particular — to bring the greatness of O3 into the picture!

Ozone eliminates bacteria, and is, therefore, the perfect solution to cleaning an infected tooth. What’s even better is that ozone treatment will just come in the form of ozonated water or an ozone gas. Continual application to the surgical site promotes impossibly thorough sterility, while even speeding up the process and recovery. Ozone therapy does not cause negative side effects or allergic reactions in patients, and allows the natural immune system to fight off infection.

Using ozone for cavity treatment makes the filling or restoring process much easier and smoother. Guaranteeing sterility to avoid worse problems later is crucial during any serious dental work, and ozone does the job well.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com

CEREC Dentistry: Inlays and Onlays

The CEREC process for designing inlays and onlays is similar to the designing of a crown, only the function is different.

CEREC inlays are the superior versions of composite cavity fillings; superior due to the strength and aesthetics that the ceramic brings. Inlays milled from this ceramic material last far longer than any other cavity solution. They also behave most similarly to natural tooth enamel, in both appearance and feel.

Onlays (a.k.a. partial crowns) are the remedy to extensive cavity damage, covering a larger area of the tooth. In past cases, the weaker disposition of composite — or the porcelain restorations that contained metal — would require a full crown to be designed in order to maintain the tooth’s strength. Because CEREC onlays are so strong, one that is well-built will do everything it needs to do, causing minimal extra tooth damage and eliminating the need for a full crown.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

http://www.dds4smiles.com