Gum Disease and Whole-Body Health

A few months ago I wrote a post about dental health’s connection to whole-body health, and how a patient dealing with a mouth disease and another disease could be experiencing two symptoms of one root cause, or a deeper health issue that may be overlooked. I want to continue this discussion by using the example of the factoring causes that link gum disease to other illnesses.

Gum (periodontal) disease happens when bacteria build up separates tooth and gum, leading to infection, decay, and tooth loss. Several studies are being done that connect this to a list of other health problems, including diabetes, cardiovascular (heart) disease, cancer, pregnancy issues, osteoporosis, gluten intolerance, and obesity. But how are they connected? If we look at the body as one whole, functioning system, there are some root causes that could explain the relationship between two (seemingly) separate problems.

One cause to be aware of is oxygen deficiency in the body, which is often overlooked. When the system isn’t receiving the oxygen it needs, the body cannot function normally and the outcome is an increased risk of cancer, disease, infection, aches and pains, and other overall metabolic malfunctions.

Another important factor when looking at overall health is the body’s pH balance. Anything below 7 on a pH scale is acidic, and anything above 7 is alkaline. Because many people’s diets consist of inflammatory foods, it is easy for their pH balance to be below 7, causing the body’s system to be overly acidic. This inhibits and harms the metabolism and immune system, making them much more susceptible to disease and infection, from gum disease to heart issues.

These are just a few possibilities, and at the root of them is an unhealthy lifestyle that results in a body unarmed to fight disease. This is why being aware that your body is a systematic whole is so important! Take care of your teeth, take care of your body, and don’t believe that they are isolated; the health of one affects the health of the other. Here’s to healthier mouths and bodies, and a better quality of life!

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

Tonsil Infection Treatment through Neural Therapy

Tonsillitis is a problem for many, but what exactly is it, and why is it so important that you have a safe healing process? Let me explain, and explain how neural therapy can help.

Tonsils are interdependent with the teeth, neck and face, and studies show that the toxins in the teeth go to the tonsils, making it very easy for them to be infected and inflamed. If proper mouth hygiene is not being practiced, or you are having other dental issues, your tonsils are more likely to become inflamed from bacteria, and swollen tonsils can obstruct the throat making eating and breathing very difficult. Remember, however: your mouth is not unrelated to the rest of your body. Tonsils serve an important purpose for your immune system and tonsillitis indicates an unhealthy lifestyle or compromised immunity that can even be directly connected to chronic pain. Because so much of the body’s health is related to the tonsils it’s important that they are given proper attention!

With recurring inflammation, many opt to have their tonsils surgically removed, called a tonsillectomy. This procedure can be uncomfortable or painful, and for some people it doesn’t take care of the root problem. Before you make this decision I urge to consider neural therapy as an option that has proven to be effective in draining tonsil infection. Injections of procaine and/or ozone are given directly into the inflamed area which drains and clears up swelling, reduces pain, and smooths out disturbances. Neural therapy is also effective because it can get to the bottom of chronic pain and gives your body the tools it needs to stimulate safe, healthy healing and living without surgery.

If neural therapy is right for you, contact my office for details pertaining to this service, or get in touch with a dentist near you who uses neural therapy.

Dr. Glenn Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

TMJ Treatment through Neural Therapy

Studies show that everyday millions of people struggle with Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ). It causes pain that disrupts daily life making basic activities a hassle when they shouldn’t be. I want to explain what TMJ is and why I offer neural therapy as a helpful way to control the pain.

The temporomandibular is the joint that connects the jaw and skull, allowing the mouth to open and close. TMJ may develop from teeth grinding, arthritis, or other related bad habits. Symptoms include pain/tenderness in the jaw, face, neck, shoulders, and ears; trouble chewing; chipping and loss of teeth; ringing in ears; and body aches. Treatment options include anti-inflammatory drugs, pain killers, mouth appliances, and surgery. If you aren’t finding any of these helpful, another option to consider is neural therapy.

Neural therapy is a non-invasive, pain management treatment that begins with taking a detailed medical and dental history of the patient to determine the source of the pain being experienced. From there, injections of procaine and ozone (together called “prolozone”) are given into a carefully determined location on the body. Prolozone encourages healing in this area that has been hindered by a previous injury or scar, which are called interference fields. This is beneficial because it smooths out disturbances in the interference fields, allowing the body a chance to stimulate its healing process in an area where it was previously unable. Ozone injections are particularly helpful because ozone oxygenates tissue, improving circulation and activating the immune system. A treatment of one or more injections are given over a course of several weeks in order to allow for the body to heal properly and naturally. This treatment has been very influential in helping those who are struggling with TMJ, getting to the root of jaw and mouth pain.

If your TMJ is causing you pain and you aren’t satisfied with other treatment programs, I encourage you to consider neural therapy as a safe and effective way to control the pain and help your jaw function properly!

Dr. Glenn Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

Your Teeth Are Alive

Our teeth are living, active parts of our body. They are kept healthy primarily like the rest of our body is kept healthy: from the inside. Nutrients in our blood circulate in and out of teeth through the roots, providing crucial minerals that harden and strengthen tooth structure and prevent infection. That’s why we can’t ignore our health when considering dental treatment. Teeth are very much connected to the rest of the body. I think unconsciously we tend to treat them like they aren’t. It is secondarily (but closely so) that our teeth kept healthy from the outside by frequent cleaning and avoiding external damage from certain foods and substances.

The first point is what I want to draw your attention to. If toxins reside in your body because of ineffective cleanup, they will travel to your teeth. In a similar fashion, a malnourished body will not be able to keep teeth mineralized or cavity-free because it doesn’t have the nutrient stores to draw upon for it. Systemic inflammation and illness will reflect in a person’s mouth; however, it may be in different ways to different degrees depending on the person.

I’ve said many times before that the condition of a person’s dental health reflects his or her physical health. Thus, if your body is toxic, your teeth will be toxic or at least much more sensitive to disease. Please take care of your body, because your teeth are affected too.

In the next few posts, I’ll share some thoughts about teeth themselves becoming toxic and how that might affect the rest of the body.

Dr. Glenn Sperbeck, West Los Angeles

Dental Health is Not Isolated from Whole-Body Health

I haven’t written enough on nutrition’s role in dentistry except for one specific post and mentioning here and there how healthy teeth begin with a healthy body. Nutrition isn’t my recognized area of expertise; but working in conjunction with other natural doctors, nutritionists, and others and seeking the best for myself and my family has brought me heaps of knowledge and enhanced my dentistry.

Maybe you’ve seen a lot of content published in many natural food/health communities about curing tooth decay, tooth remineralization, and cavity reversal. This doesn’t directly address more serious problems like dental implants, occlusal correction, or serious gum recession caused by gingivitis/periodontitis. Those more advanced conditions are more exciting to me as it is. But restoring dental health through dietary means can certainly solve other things like the early stages of cavities, gum disease, plaque buildup, and weak enamel caused by overall malnourishment.

Modern dentistry, like most fields of medicine, tends to isolate the mouth and teeth from the rest of the body. Just look at the nation’s stance on insurance — you must pay for your teeth separately. The body works as a whole, however. It is a complex system of functions all working together. You cannot affect one function without affecting another somehow. Amalgam may be a cheap and easy way to fill teeth, but what about the mercury that leaks out and embeds itself in organs and tissues all over the body? Braces effectively straighten teeth, but will the patient’s bite change and cause TMJ problems later in life, not to mention the hassle of wearing retainers indefinitely? Removing natural tooth structure for a crown or undergoing a root canal may remove an obvious problem, but do you know how that actually burdens your immune system?

Just some food for thought.

Dr. Sperbeck, West Los Angeles